Did they teach you these in school?

You can sneeze faster than a cheetah can run.

The speed of a sneeze is around 100 mph which is faster than cheetahs run, the fastest animal alive. This is four-and-a-half times faster than Usain Bolt’s record, and 20 times faster than Michael Phelps. (Unfortunately, we also expel about 100,000 germs when we sneeze.)

Water makes different pouring sounds depending on its temperature.

Listen very closely, hot water and cold water sound slightly different when being poured. The heat changes the thickness, or viscosity, of the water, which changes the pitch of the sound it makes when it’s poured. What we feel as heat comes from the molecules of the water moving faster. Cold water is thicker and therefore makes a slightly higher-pitched sound.

Humans are just one of the estimated 8.7 million species on Earth

Human beings may seem to dominate the planet with sprawling cities and sophisticated technology, but we are, in fact, just one species among some 8.7 million that live together on planet Earth. One 2011 study published in the journal PLoS Biology estimated that “the various forms of life on the planet included 7.8 million species of animals, 298,000 species of plants, 611,000 species of mushrooms, mold and other fungi, 36,400 species of protozoa, and 27,500 species of algae or chromists.” And it’s worth noting that the researchers did not venture to put an estimate on the number of bacteria.

There’s a country where twins are most likely to be born

Benin, a country in central Africa, is notable for having the highest birth rate of twins in the world. While the world average is just 13 twins per 1,000 births, Benin more than doubles that rate, at nearly 30 twins per 1,000 births. There’s no single factor that causes this, but genetics, diet, and even the mother’s height are thought to play a role.

Sweat doesn’t actually stink

You may have noticed any sweat you produce right after a shower doesn’t smell that awful. The reason is because your sweat itself isn’t stinky; it’s the bacteria on your skin that breaks the sweat down that causes the odor. Additionally, you’ll find that the sweat on your arms and legs doesn’t smell as much as your armpits. That’s because sweat glands in your armpits secrete more protein into a dark, damp environment—the perfect place and food for bacteria.

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